Tuesday, May 29, 2012

Preparatory Training

I know I've written about training for everyday life and all that it throws at us before, but that was really highlighted again for me over the weekend. I had to move. And when I say move, I mean that I had to move heavy furniture and other extremely awkward things. 

If you have ever moved (stuff), you know all too well how exhausting and taxing this can be. Moving challenges everything you've got. It challenges, your movement abilities, your flexibility, your strength, and your wits. There is nothing like trying to carry big, heavy, awkward cabinets down a flight of stairs, especially if you are on the bottom. Just doing something like this teaches valuable lessons in tension, breathing, muscle control, patience, and God. Yes, carrying heavy things while walking backwards down a flight of stairs can really bring you closer to God as you will find yourself talking to Him quite a bit! 

Anyway, while carrying these cabinets, a thankful thought crossed my mind: I was capable and able to do this. I truly was thankful. It is a gift and a blessing to be able to pull something off like safely moving heavy furniture up and down flights of stairs. Not only was I thankful that I could do this, I was also thankful that my training had prepared me to do it. 

And that is the point of all of this, again. Everything I grabbed yesterday was very big and awkward. Nothing had convenient handles to grab. I couldn't fit my arms around most of the things I had to move. I had to bend, stoop, and reach in awkward positions. I had to move "real world" stuff - for about 8 hours. I slept good last night, really good. When I woke up this morning, I bounced right out of bed, feeling good. What a blessing!

My only point is, you should prepare yourself for the challenges of day to day, or month to month, tasks. If you don't ever train outside of a health club, you should. Learn how to pick up rocks and move them from place to place. Get a harness and drag something. If you have never turned your kettlebell upside down, do it. Learn how to manage a kettlebell in the bottoms up position. Do things that are not always "easy", or "convenient". Do things that are different, or awkward. 

For some of you, learning how to crawl fits in here too. If you can't crawl, learn how. Crawling just might be the one thing that truly prepares you for life's variables. 

Challenge yourself. Life happens outside of the weight room. It is an awesome thing to have to be faced with a challenge and conquer it. As silly as it sounds, it is an awesome thing to become thankful while you are moving cabinets down a flight of stairs because you realize you were prepared for the challenge. It is even more awesome to be able to bounce out of bed the next day and embrace whatever life is ready to throw your way. 

Bottom line: Don't just train to prepare yourself for your next workout.  Train for your health. 


3 comments:

funfunkyDr.J. said...

Training a body thats not just resistant to injury, but immovably healthy, and if something does go off, resilient, and heals quickly?

Recovery, bulletproof body. Well, I hurt myself playing volleyball about a week ago now. Damn, hyperextended my knee, and it'll probably be a while before it heals. It seemed like you might have some advice for training to beat that sort of injury(once its healed, and I am pain free for long enough first, of course). I have a few thoughts. 1. pay attention to where your landing(I was looking not where I was coming down, why I fell wrong) 2. train up( I played hard, for the first time playing in years) 3. do training that prepares me for what I am doing. I am wondering what input you might have to this, thinking maybe a post might speak to, making a body that is ready, capable, and can be taken into adventures safely, one that is resilient etc. ...( cause damn it, I like to use this body, and getting hurt gets in the way)How do you train so that you can go as hard as you want to, safely, and healthily? For example, one thing, so that training, or doing what you want to do makes you stronger, builds you up, instead of getting injured. Etc. ...

funfunkyDr.J. said...

Training a body thats not just resistant to injury, but immovably healthy, and if something does go off, resilient, and heals quickly?

Recovery, bulletproof body. Well, I hurt myself playing volleyball about a week ago now. Damn, hyperextended my knee, and it'll probably be a while before it heals. It seemed like you might have some advice for training to beat that sort of injury(once its healed, and I am pain free for long enough first, of course). I have a few thoughts. 1. pay attention to where your landing(I was looking not where I was coming down, why I fell wrong) 2. train up( I played hard, for the first time playing in years) 3. do training that prepares me for what I am doing. I am wondering what input you might have to this, thinking maybe a post might speak to, making a body that is ready, capable, and can be taken into adventures safely, one that is resilient etc. ...( cause damn it, I like to use this body, and getting hurt gets in the way)How do you train so that you can go as hard as you want to, safely, and healthily? For example, one thing, so that training, or doing what you want to do makes you stronger, builds you up, instead of getting injured. Etc. ...

Tim Anderson said...

funFunky Dr. J,

Sorry about the knee. I know that getting injured is a bummer. While you are healing, you might try lots of commando crawling on the ground. It may give you some real good core work and lots of skin stimulation. Who knows, it may even promote healing?

To answer your question, I truly believe in everything I wrote about in Becoming Bulletproof. I apply those principles daily and have for almost 2 years now. I feel better than I ever have and I truly believe I can embark on any challenge I want to take.

I hope this helps a little. Thank you so much for reading my blog and contributing.

Tim